Life in the victims department.

A DAY AT THE OFFICE

It’s been four months since I joined HAART Kenya in the Victims department. “Multiple phones ring at the office and everyone too busy to pick up as they try to find a solution to a case or solve an urgent victim’s problem. I pick one up a minute later and to my surprise it’s a referral case. The person on the phone states “I need to understand what you do as an Organization.” I explain what HAART Kenya does in relation to human trafficking cases and then my caller hangs up. I dial back and the caller says that they need help to resolve a case on child neglect. I am quick to remember a referral partner organization that deals with such cases and I direct the caller to a relevant contact person to get help because as we deal majorly in assisting potential victims of human trafficking.

I take a minute to breathe in and out. In that moment my colleague calls out the case workers and what follows is that we have a new case that needs urgent attention. At that moment everything I was doing comes to a stop because our main objective is that a potential victim comes first at any given time. We get the contact details of the victim, full names, phone contact, emergency contact and then ensure that the victim whether a minor or an adult is safe in the environment he or she is in. If it needs an immediate follow up then one of the case workers is tasked with that objective. If a minor is not safe and the referral body has the child an immediate rescue is done on the child and they are transferred to a safe location; the HAART Kenya shelter. Adults are requested to ensure they are secure before attempting to run or move from the situation there in.

Another week passes and our cases are pilling up. The Case Workers are up and down trying to ensure that our victims at hand are safe and all documentation needed for the victim’s psycho-social support, home tracing, referral agencies and home re-integration are up-to date. The Case Management system is an easy to use, friendly online platform that helps us update past and recent cases anytime and anywhere. This is our main tool while at the office as it enables every case worker and the management team as a whole to have a clear outline of all the cases handled within the schedule.

The department handles all potential victims cases ensuring proper documentation and making follow up phone calls to victims and referral organization that help us in times of home tracing, home re-integration and relevant support.  The department has our in-house therapist who handles cases that need urgent psycho-therapy sessions on our victims. The office has a therapy room for our victims who show up when sessions are organized for them.

We have monthly department meetings which take place on the first week of the every month. This meeting helps us share our experiences while handling different victims and their case histories and it helps us see positive impacts on the field from each case workers side of the story. It is always necessary to ensure that all details are shared among the victim department personnel in relevance to the victims’ well-being. On the same day we always have a self-care program that entails a yoga session or a massage session that helps everyone de-stress from the day to day work by improving our morale as well as our mental and physical state.

A DAY ON THE FIELD

A day on the field is not as easy as it looks or sounds when it requires you to move up and down finding referral letters for cases given to us by children officers. A day following up on a minor victim as a case worker entails some tasks such as moving from one area to another to ensure all children offices give us referral letters and ensuring that home tracing for the child has been done which later if successful leads to home re-integration with the family. Other cases that have court hearings are filed and are sent to our legal team which works to ensure security for our minor victims who at that time are safe at the Shelter. On adult cases we make trips to areas they live in after they have been put through a psycho-social support system to enable them re-integrate well, back to the society that was once evil to them.

My best moments are the days when am tasked with cases and it turns out successful; not to me personally but to the different potential victims we help through HAART’s psycho-social support, re-integration back to society, when a minor who gets back the right to see her or his family, aperson who wins the right to education and the freedom to smile and live as a child once more.

By John Njeru

HAART’s shelter inception; perspectives from the manager.

”The first time I visited this place [HAART shelter] I was thinking – it just has it all for those girls. It is a place for healing and it is just a homely place… It is just what they need and it is a place with silence… I totally loved it” 

The idea of creating a HAART shelter came about when I was meeting another employee at HAART through a different job. I remember; I was talking to her and asked – “why is HAART not starting their own shelter?”

I remember that after we had that conversation and she said; “You wait. We will think about it”

One month later, she called me and said; “Yes, now we thought about it and yes, we are going to start our own HAART shelter – Would you be interested in coming in and for an interview?”

Immediately I said yes and went to the interview. I really got happy when I heard they had identified a place for victims of trafficking. I now work for HAART Kenya as the shelter manager. It is a shelter where they deal with girls who are victims of trafficking up to the ages of eighteen years.

Garden at the shelter.

We now have the capacity to hold up to twenty girls. But in the future we want to have the capacity for around twenty-six girls. At the moment we have eight girls at the shelter and eight girls in the boarding school. We actually also have three babies at the shelter and one in school with her mother.

Additionally at the shelter we have a lady who cooks and cleans for the survivors. We also have a housemother who takes care of the babies because we have girls who are young mothers, and they need help, because of the vulnerable situation in which they are and have been in. To be around the girls we have a residential social worker who must be present. She is here for social activities with the children such as life skills, playing games, exercise and school training.  We also have a woman who is a local social worker. She helps all the survivors in the shelter.  For security we have a guard all day and night. Sometimes there can be five of us and in the night we are usually two.

We have a full and active program for kids in the daytime with different activities. The shelter has items which any normal household would have, but also items for creative activities. One of the girls is very good at knitting and here they have the opportunities to learn various skills which they can use later in life.

The main reason the shelter exists is to provide a safe place for victims of trafficking to stay.

We are rescuing the children from trafficking, together with the police and the area children’s officer. The local administration, the chief and the communities’ leaders are also involved.

In the first week that a survivor comes to the shelter we complete the medical screening process. This is to clarify what their medical and the nutrients state is. We work with the medical section regarding this process but it could be good idea to establish stronger partnerships so the cost can come down and the help is easier for the survivors to receive.

We also identify any physical damage or chronic diseases such as hepatitis, HIV or diabetes so we can help them to get into a medical program and tackle the issue.

After the medical screening is complete we start up psycho-social support with our psychologist. The survivor can have up to ten sessions. If it is possible after three months we go to a family visit to assess if we can reintegrate the child back into the family and the community.

For the future we have great aspirations. We have a dream of building a bigger shelter for which could host to one hundred children. We see the need out there and we could easily have one hundred children. There are many victims of trafficking. For the time being however, we can only help around 1 % and that is heart-breaking to know. There are so many children out there who are not going to have the help they need.

Generally the amount of time survivors can be with us ranges from three months to one year. On occasion it can be up to three years if the government support us. It is important to remember that all cases are unique and our main focus is to have respect for the children/girls and give them a place and time to grow, heal and feel safe again. That is why the shelter was created.

 

By Christine Macharia

Human Trafficking in the Courtroom.

Human Trafficking in the Courtroom.

It is the third week since I arrived in Kenya. I am sitting in a wooden bench, in a courtroom located somewhere in Nairobi, surrounded by an expectant crowd that patiently listens to the Judge, the clerks, the prosecutor and the involved parties of each one of the cases. I do not understand Kiswahili yet, so I cannot really tell what is going on. However, Julie, my colleague, explains to me the development of each case as we wait for ours.

We are there to accompany and provide support to one of the victims that receive HAART Kenya’s services at our shelter. Her name is Paula (pseudonym). She was informed of the fact that she was going to testify. The victim had also received the corresponding psychological assistance in order to be as mentally prepared as possible to face the challenge of re-telling her story in front of a legal system that still has a lot to do in order to prevent the re-victimization of victims like her. She would also receive assistance after the hearing, to help her overcome whatever she would face.

Finally, her hearing starts. From time to time she turns around and looks at us with her big eyes and her nervous smile, to check if we are there. Since in Kenya, as in many other countries, the victim’s participation during the legal proceedings is quite limited and prosecution in criminal cases remains the responsibility of the state which explains our limited role in the process. Therefore we cannot take a really active role during the hearing, but a supportive one.

It is a human right to be able to cross-examine the evidence whenever one is being accused of a crime. This is a process that in an ideal situation, the defendant should always have legal representation in the form of advocate. However, the situation in Kenya is not ideal and in many cases, the accused rarely has a defence lawyer. In general, if he/she lacks the funds to afford on the government rarely assigns one. This means that if they do not have a lawyer, the responsibility to cross examine the evidence lies with the accused. As fate would have it, this was the case in this courtroom; the accused has to cross-examine the testimony of the victim himself.

There she is, sitting in her wooden chair with her knees together, next to the prosecutor, spitting word by word what happened to her, in front of the exact same person that was responsible for all of it. I feel a knot in my throat as I can only imagine how she must be feeling right now. The bravery she is showing to all of us is a source of inspiration. It is the fuel that makes all of us feel hope and a sense of responsibility towards the well-being of victims and survivors.

Even when, at this hearing, the defender was not being particularly accused of human trafficking, Paula found herself in this situation as a direct consequence of her situation as victim of human trafficking. Sexual abuse was just but one of the abuses that she went through the process of trafficking.  She was rescued from that situation by HAART who then placed her in shelter managed by another organization. Unfortunately, while in that shelter which was supposed to be a place of safety, she was, again, sexually abused. The flaws of a system designed to protect victims like her become apparent. After this experience, HAART decided that opening its own shelter would be the better idea to prevent another situation like that. Currently, she receives all the assistance that our staff can provide in order to help her develop into a resilient human being.

Unfortunately, her story is not unique. A victim of human trafficking and a survivor of gender based sexual violence that was seeking for assistance and, instead, found herself re victimized by a system that was not able to protect her and ensure her safety is a common story.

Her story should make us think about how hard all of us – civil society, government agencies, international organizations – need to work in order to implement and develop a system that ensures the protection of victims. We should be encouraging and facilitating their access to justice as it is a human right, while preventing them from being re victimized. By the very system designed to protect them.

By Ignacio Lepro

 

Progress: A Shelter for Victims of Human Trafficking.

Progress: A Shelter for Victims of Human Trafficking.

On the 8th of June I traveled to an undisclosed location in Kenya to visit HAART’s shelter for rescued victims of human trafficking. A few hours drive from the capital the area is quiet serene and it is a perfect setting for aiding the rehabilitation of victims of trafficking.

unnamed

The shelter was opened in December 2016 when it was a much needed facility. The shelter has all the facilities for survivors to lead a healthy and safe life as long as they are residing there.

Importance of the shelter?

The shelter is very beneficial for a victims rehabilitation and re-integration back into society. By bringing a daily routine and structure into their lives it allows them to get back to normality after a very traumatic experience. For example, the shelter has a kitchen where residents can cook meals for the group each day. There is a small but expanding library so residents can practice reading and writing. It was nice to see these young people had real aspirations. Up on the wall the survivors stated their dreams of becoming lawyers, doctors, nurses and teachers. These were fantastic goals to aim for and the chances of them being pursued much more likely as a result of this shelter.

The shelter (which the location cannot be disclosed for security reasons) has a maximum capacity of 20 where female victims of trafficking can stay. Usually they are between the ages 8-18. Typically these victims are rescued from traffickers or rescued while they are in transit to their destination; often the Middle East.

HAART has a very dedicated legal team who fight to prosecute traffickers and any other people involved in the illegal trade of persons. However, it is not a cheap undertaking to keep the shelter running. HAART will always welcome any donations or second-hand items such as furniture, housing items, food or anything else which will help keep the great work continue.

According to International Organization for Migration (IOM) more than 20,000 victims are trafficked through Kenya annually from neighboring countries including Ethiopia, Somalia and South Sudan. This is a frightening statistic considering the Kenyan Government implemented a new law which was created in 2010 to tackle the issue of trafficking. However, the Counter-Trafficking in Persons Act has had very little impact and the issue remains very prevalent today. This number must be reduced.

It was quiet a shock for me to learn that with the current rate of human trafficking of females into prostitution globally, it is a much more lucrative business than drug trafficking (or any other forms of transnational criminality for that matter). US Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan stated in April 2017:

“Human trafficking for sex earns more money than drug trafficking that is why there are more organised criminal gangs globally. One of the current debates is to reduce demand for sex, delegitimise purchase of sex and stop prosecutions of people who sell sex and prosecute the purchasers,”

It is with such worrying statements like that of Attorney General Lisa Madigan that the goal of raising awareness on the matter of human trafficking in Kenya and further abroad is so important. It is why HAART is dedicated to the cause. As Benjamin Franklin once said

“justice will not be served until those who are unaffected are as outraged as those who are.”

We ask for your support today.

 

By James Fahey

On transit

Taking a business trip or even leisure trip and going through the immigration process and airports processes is a normal thing to most people. We normally travel oblivious of every other process in the same airport or plane with us; minding our own business to the latter. This was the case for my colleagues and I when we were returning to Kenya from Ethiopia. Checking in and queuing at airport in Addis Ababa in Ethiopia was normal.

As we went up the escalator in search of our gate we met a lady who seemed not to be sure of where she was going. She was staring at the escalator, seemingly not understanding how it works. She did not speak English and thus verbal communication was difficult. She showed her boarding pass to my colleague, she needed to know where her gate was as well and so we directed her. Luckily she was going in our direction and it was easy to help her. Her boarding pass indicated that she was travelling to Lebanon. This immediately became suspicious to us as a possible case of trafficking but we did not make much of it. This was not until we got to her gate. There were seated about nine ladies all travelling to Lebanon. The lady we met on the escalator was happy to see them, they seem to know each other. There and then our suspicion was even better qualified. None of the women spoke English we quickly sought out someone who could speak Amharic which was what they spoke. Luckily, one of the shop attendants agreed to help us. We gave them the contact of an organization that they could get in touch with in case they got into trouble in Lebanon. At this stage, there was nothing much we could do as they were set to travel.

Photo by Bethan Uitterdijk

This is just but one out of the many instances that go unnoticed. We often see young men and women that are traveling on fights to the Middle East in the Nairobi and Addis Ababa airports. Ideally there immigration and airport personel should be aware and provide some form of awareness on human trafficking given to such vulnerable  groups at the airports so that they are aware maybe we could avert some trafficking cases. If there was a bit more in-depth investigation done by the immigration when such groups or individuals are applying for visas or leaving their countries through the airports; then maybe more cases of trafficking would be averted and even capture the perpetrators. We need sensitization and awareness raising on human trafficking in our airports and with immigration.

By Phyllis Mburu

The face of joy

I think one of the most satisfying things on earth is seeing someone who has not known joy and peace finally find it. It is even more satisfying to be involved in their walk to realizing this and watch their reactions afterwards.

By Rehema Baya

This was the feeling I had on the last day of November 2016 when HAART’s shelter was officially opened and the children were brought in. The excitement was written all over their faces; knowing that they will be at HAART’s shelter where they would receive the care and protection they require. They were excited about the space and the faces they met; most especially the victims department members who have walked with them and toiled tirelessly to see the shelter become a reality.

The girls had just closed school and this was home to them. They giggled to each other while having dinner; a clear indication of the friendships they had created and having a roof over their heads just crowned it. I observed how fast they became comfortable in the place. They were not shy to choose their beds and walk around the shelter to familiarize themselves with the place. Their settling was very swift.

We shared dinner that evening as they talked about school and their journey from school to the shelter. They were happy, yes they were happy. Finally what had been denied to them; the opportunity to just be a child and receive care and attention was right in front of them. They would enjoy the holidays assured that they were safe. This made me realize how important peace of mind is to every human mind regardless of their age, and just how important it is for people to care about each other’s peace of mind. The opportunity to dream again and keep it at it knowing that it is achievable was here.

By Rehema Baya

This was a big achievement for HAART. Changing lives and doing the best while at it is one of the key roles for HAART. It was also a dream come true for HAART as the idea of having a shelter had been lingering for a while. This meant that the protection program had grown and we could confidently assist more girls without having to worry about their aftercare. More than ever before I was proud to be a part of the HAART team.

By Phyllis Mburu

A2ES video 2016

We are happy to finally be able to share the video about the Arts to End Slavery exhibition in 2016 that was recorded on the World Day against Trafficking in Persons, 30th July 2016.